Vegas Lawyer
Helping People Who
Were Hurt In Nevada

Dempsey, Roberts
& Smith, Ltd.
Attorneys-At-Law



Las Vegas Lawyers
Nevada Legal Help



Home
Car Accidents
Death Claims
Slip & Fall
Medical Injury
Product Defect
Other Claims
Contact Us

Las Vegas Lawyers

Vegas Injury Law

Welcome to Vegas Lawyer. This site is for people who were hurt in Nevada. Contact us for a free consultation. You may want to read the Las Vegas Personal Injury Law introduction on our home page. Also, you can get an overview of other claims like Wrongful Death, Auto Accidents, Slip & Fall, and Products Liability before you explore the Article below.

Click Above Or Below To Go To Vegas Lawyer:
vegaslawyer.net









Federal Tort Trials

U.S. Department of Justice - Office of Justice Programs

Bureau of Justice Statistics

Federal Tort Trials and Verdicts, 1996-97: Federal Justice Statistics Program

February 1999

During each fiscal year, 1996 and 1997, U.S. district courts terminated an average of 296,000 cases. Approximately 84% of these cases were civil, and 16% were criminal cases. Of the nearly 500,000 civil cases terminated during fiscal years 1996-97, 19% (96,284) were tort claims in which plaintiffs claimed injury, loss, or damage from defendants' negligent or intentional acts.

This report presents data on the 3,023 tort cases that a jury or bench trial decided during this 2-year period. Data on tort cases from 1996 and 1997 were combined to provide a larger number of cases for detailed analysis. Previously, the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) reported findings from a study of 1994-95 tort trial cases. (Federal Tort Trials and Verdicts, 1994-1995, BJS Special Report (NCJ 165810).)

Compared to fiscal years 1994-95, during 1996-97 --

* the overall number of tort cases terminated in U.S. district courts increased 17%

* the number of tort cases terminated by a trial verdict declined 10%

* the percentage of plaintiff winners in tort trial cases increased slightly from 43% to 45%

* the median award amount to plaintiff winners remained about $141,000.



-----------------------------------------

Highlights:

Tort cases terminated in U.S. district courts, 1996-97

Federal tort cases terminated 96,284

Jury bench trials 3,023 (3% of 96,284)

Plaintiff winner 1,249 (45% of 2,795 known cases)

Monetary awards 1,073 (86% of 1,246 known cases)

Nontrial cases 93,261 (97% of 96,284)

Highlights: * During fiscal years 1996-97, over 80% of cases terminated in U.S. district courts dealt with civil matters. Of the 250,000 civil cases terminated per year, 19% were tort cases.

* During 1996-97 U.S. district courts terminated 96, 284 tort cases, an increase of 17% from 1994-95 when 82,333 tort cases were terminated.

* Compared to 1994-95, tort cases terminated by trial verdict decreased 10% from 3,356 to 3,023 cases in 1996-97.

* Of the 96,284 tort cases terminated during fiscal years 1996-97, a jury or bench trial decided 3%, or 3,023 cases. Tort trial verdicts provide the most complete data to examine award amounts at the Federal level.

* Nearly three-fourths of tort trials in U.S. district courts resulted from a dispute between citizens and/or corporations from different States (diversity of citizenship).

* A jury decided 75% of all tort cases brought to trial in U.S. district courts. A jury trial decided a majority of diversity of citizenship cases (88%) and Federal question cases (63%).

* Plaintiffs won 45% of all tort trial cases in which a judgment was known, 44% of personal injury cases, 29% of product liability cases, and 54% of cases involving property damage.

* Of the 1,249 tort trial cases won by plaintiffs, 86% (1,073) received monetary damages with a median award of $141,000. The award was $1 million or more in 17% of these cases in 1996-97 and in 18% of the cases in 1994-95.

* The average case processing time from filing to termination in 1996-97 was 20.2 months, down from 21.8 months in 1994-95.

-----------------------------------------

This report contains information about tort cases terminated by trial verdict in U.S. district courts during fiscal years 1996 and 1997 as well as general trends in tort cases terminated in U.S. district courts since 1990. For this report only those cases terminated after the completion of a trial by jury or trial before a judge or magistrate were used. According to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AOUSC), a trial is considered complete when a verdict is returned by a jury or a decision is rendered by the court. Jury or bench trials terminated before or during the trial are excluded from this analysis. Tort trial cases appealed as well as the outcomes of appeal are not reported. Data for this report were obtained from information compiled by the AOUSC.

Tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts since 1990

The overall number of tort cases terminated fluctuated between fiscal years 1990 and 1997 (figure 1). During 1991 the overall number of tort cases that were terminated increased because a backlog of cases from the early 1980's was processed. These cases had been filed by the U.S. Government to recover overpayments of veterans' benefits and defaulted student loans. Another reason for the 1991 increase was a rise in asbestos filings during 1990 that were terminating in 1991. Civil case terminations rose again in 1996 because of an increase in Federal question case terminations attributed mostly to breast implant cases that were transferred to a single U.S. district court as part of a multi-district litigation. (Northern District of Alabama multidistrict litigation docket number 926. Source: Administrative Office of the U.S Courts, Judicial Business of the United States, 1996.)

Overall, 47221 tort cases were terminated in U.S. district courts during 1997

About 3% (1,516) of all tort cases were terminated by a bench or jury trial in U.S. district courts in 1997

Overall, the number of tort cases terminated by a trial verdict in U.S. district courts declined by an annual average of about 4% between 1990 and 1997. Over 2,000 tort cases were terminated by trial verdict in 1990, dropping to 1,714 in 1993, and reaching just over 1,500 in 1997 (figure 1). Tort cases terminated by a trial verdict as a percentage of all tort cases also have declined slightly from 5% in 1990 to 3% in 1997. Over the past 7 years, an increasing percentage of tort cases were disposed of before trial.

------------------------------------------

Nontrial tort cases terminated in U.S. district courts, 1996-97

Of the 93,261 nontrial tort cases terminated in 1996-97, 65% were terminated after the issue was joined. An issue is considered joined after the defendant has answered the complaint or has otherwise responded in accordance with Rule 12, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, or as mandated by the court. Of the 60,376 nontrial tort cases joined during 1996-97, 17% were terminated with no court action, 17% at the pretrial conference, 18% by a judicial action by a judge or magistrate judge but before any pretrial conference, and 1% by a request for a new trial on the entire case before a final judgment was entered (trial de novo).

Nearly 6 in 10 nontrial tort cases terminated after the issue was joined originated in a U.S. district court, while about 3 in 10 were removed from a State court. The majority (53%) of these nontrial tort cases were brought to a U.S. district court based on a diversity of citizenship issue and 39% because of a Federal question. Of the 5,330 nontrial tort cases for which a winner was known, defendants won in 71% and plaintiffs in 22% of cases. Monetary awards were given in 16% of the cases after the issue was joined.

---------------------------------------

U.S. district court jurisdiction

Jurisdiction refers to the basis for filing a civil action in a U.S. district court. U.S. district courts exercise jurisdiction in civil actions that--

* deal with a Federal question arising from the interpretation and application of the U.S. Constitution, acts of Congress, or treaties ("Federal question")

* exceed $75,000 and are between parties (citizens and/or corporations) residing in different States or parties of a State and citizens, corporations, or subjects of a foreign country ("diversity of citizenship") (The minimum value required was $10,000 until 1989 and $50,000 until 1996, when it was raised to $75,000 in P.L. 104-317, Federal Courts Improvement Act of 1996.)

* are initiated by the U.S. Government ("U.S. plaintiff"), (Title 28 U.S.C. Section 1345 and 1348.) or

* are brought against the U.S. Government for alleged negligent or wrongful acts resulting in personal injury or property damage ("U.S. defendant"). (Title 28 U.S.C. Section 1346.)

During fiscal years 1996-97, 72% of tort trial cases were tried in U.S. district courts because of the diversity of citizenship between the parties in the case.

Federal questions provided the basis for jurisdiction in 16% of the cases, while 12% were filed in U.S. district courts because the U.S. Government was the defendant. Jurisdiction based on local questions or where the U.S. Government was the plaintiff accounted for less than 1% of tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts.

Federal jurisdiction in tort trials over time

Since 1994 the decline in the number of tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts occurred across all areas of Federal jurisdiction. During fiscal years 1994 through 1997, the number of Federal question cases terminated by trial decreased from 329 to 226, and cases in which the U.S.Government was a defendant from 209 to 174.

Federal question cases as a proportion of all tort trials, however, declined steadily from 19% in 1994 to 15% in 1997.

-----------------------------------------------

The proportion of diversity of citizenship cases climbed annually from 68% in 1994 to 73% in 1997. The annual proportion of cases in which the United States was the defendant remained steady at about 12% of tort trials terminated between 1994 and 1997.

Origin of tort trial cases

The majority (62%) of tort trial cases terminated in fiscal years 1996-97 originated in U.S. district court. An additional 28% of all tort trial cases were civil actions initiated in State courts but removed to a U.S. district court, 6% were reopened or reinstated, and 3% were transferred from another district. Less than 1% of cases were either remanded from appellate court, appealed to a district judge from a magistrate judge judgment, or originated from a multi-district litigation.

The nature of tort trial cases

For the purposes of this report, tort cases are organized into two categories: personal and property. Personal tort cases involve injury to a person or to the reputation of a person. Property tort cases involve damage to one's personal property.

During 1996-97 personal injury cases accounted for 9 out of 10 tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts. Motor vehicle (19%) and product liability (16%) cases were the most frequent types of personal injury cases, followed by medical malpractice cases (7%). By comparison, property damage cases constituted the remaining 7% of tort trials terminated in U.S. district courts. The largest portion of property damage cases involved fraud (3%) and other property damage (3%). Property damage associated with product liability constituted 1% of tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts.

Tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts, 1996-97 Type of tort cases:

    Airplane - Assault, libel, and slander - Federal employers' liability - Marine - Motor vehicles - Medical malpractice - Product liability - Airplane - Marine - Motor vehicle - Asbestos - Other - Fraud - Truth-in-lending - Product liability

Over the 4 years between 1994 and 1997, the overall number of tort trials declined 13%, with more than 200 fewer tort cases terminated by a trial verdict in 1997 compared to 1994. This drop in the number of tort trial cases is due largely to a decline in certain types of personal injury cases. Between 1994 to 1997 the number of marine cases declined from 146 to 96, medical malpractice cases from 151 to 108, and personal injury cases dealing with motor vehicles from 318 to 278 cases.

Trial terminations

Federal civil trial cases can be decided by either a jury comprised of 6 to 12 members (jury trial) or a Federal judge or magistrate judge (bench trial). The plaintiff or the defendant may request the case be decided by a jury trial. If no request for a jury trial is made by either party, the case is tried by a bench trial. However, in most cases in which the United States is named as the defendant, Federal law stipulates that only a bench trial is allowed. (Title 28 U.S.C. Section 2402.) Jury verdicts in a Federal civil case must be unanimous and cannot be taken from a jury of fewer than six members.

Jury or bench trial?

Three-quarters of tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts were decided by a jury trial and a quarter by a bench trial during fiscal years 1996-97. The balance of jury trials differed across case jurisdiction. The majority of diversity of citizenship (88%) and Federal question (63%) cases were decided by a jury trial, while 67% of cases involving the U.S. Government as a plaintiff and 92% as a defendant were decided by a bench trial. The type of trial termination differed according to the nature of the case. Jury trials were held in three-quarters of personal injury cases compared to just over half of property damage cases. About 90% of personal injury product liability cases were disposed of by jury trial. Bench trials decided 43% of property damage cases compared to 24% of personal injury cases.

Trial winners and awards

During fiscal years 1996-97, plaintiffs won in 45% of all trial cases decided in U.S. district courts. Plaintiffs, however, won in 54% of property damage cases compared to 44% of personal injury cases. Plaintiffs won most often (71%) in cases involving Federal employers' liability but least often (23%) in personal injury cases dealing with the product liability of motor vehicles.

Tort cases typically involved a compensatory award for economic damages. This includes all financial losses resulting from the defendant's conduct. Tort cases also can include a compensatory award for noneconomic damages such as pain, suffering, and emotional distress.

Distinct from compensatory damages are punitive damages. Punitive damages are reserved, almost exclusively, for tort claims in which the defendant's conduct was grossly negligent or intentional. In the tables and text presented below, award amounts include compensatory and punitive damages. Because of the nature of the data, the award amounts for each type of damage cannot be identified separately. Additionally, information presented is for tort cases in which the judgment was a monetary award for damages. Tort trial cases awarding court costs only or court costs and attorney fees were excluded from the award analysis.

In 86% or 1,073 of tort trial cases in which plaintiffs won, the jury or court awarded damages. This varied little across the type of case. Plaintiff winners were awarded damages in 87% of personal injury cases and 78% of property damage cases. In 84% of the medical malpractice cases, 88% of personal injury motor vehicle cases, and 82% of fraud cases, plaintiff winners were awarded damages.

The median award for all tort cases was $141,000. The median differed, however, by type of case. Among plaintiff winners awarded damages, half of those in personal injury cases received at least $136,000 and half of those in property damage cases at least $154,000. The median award for plaintiff winners in personal injury motor vehicle cases was $91,000 and product liability cases $527,000.

More than $1 million was awarded to 10% of all plaintiff winners who received damages in tort trial cases. Thirty-one percent of plaintiff winners in airplane personal injury cases, 20% of personal injury product liability, and 15% of medical malpractice cases were awarded damages of $1 million or more.

In 8% of tort trial cases, plaintiff winners were awarded $10 million or more. About 13% of plaintiffs in medical malpractice cases and personal injury product liability cases received awards of $10 million or more for damages.

Tort trials with the U.S. Government

The Federal Tort Claims Act governs tort actions against the U.S. Government. This act provides the legal mechanism for compensating persons injured by the negligent or wrongful acts of Federal employees committed within the scope of their employment. An administrative claim to the appropriate Federal agency is a prerequisite before filing suit in U.S. district court. If the claim is denied by the Federal agency in writing or if the Federal agency does not make a decision about the claim within 6 months, then the claimant can file suit in U.S. district court. Lawsuits under the act can only be tried by bench trial. (Title 28 U.S.C. Section 2671-2680.)

The Torts Branch of the Civil Division within the Department of Justice represents the United States, its agencies, and its officers sued in tort actions. This includes suits against the United States under the Federal Tort Claims Act, the Public Vessels Act, all admiralty suits, and common-law suits against individual government employees. (Urban A. Lester and Michael F. Noone, Litigation with the Federal Government, 3rd edition. Philadelphia: The American Law Institute, 1994.)

During fiscal years 1996-97, the U.S. Government was party to 371 tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts. Six of these cases involved the U.S. Government as a plaintiff. The U.S. Government won four of the six cases and received a monetary award in three of the cases.

The U.S. Government was a defendant in the remaining 365 tort trial cases in which the U.S. Government was party. These cases were mostly personal injury cases related to motor vehicles, medical malpractice, and other personal injury. The U.S. Government won about half of the cases in which it was named as a defendant. In nine of the tort trial cases in which the United States as a defendant won the judgment, monetary damages were awarded. The median award for these cases was $70,000.

Federal question cases

During fiscal years 1996-97, U.S. district courts terminated 473 tort trial cases that involved a Federal question. Nine out of every ten of these cases dealt with personal injury matters, relating particularly to marine personal injury (165 cases) and Federal employers' liability (133 cases). Of tort trials based on Federal question jurisdiction, plaintiffs won in 53% or 231 cases and received monetary awards in 203 cases. The median award among plaintiff winners in these cases was $175,000.

Diversity of citizenship cases

About 72% of the tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts involved diversity of citizenship. Of these 2,178 cases, about 60% involved a U.S. citizen as the plaintiff and a U.S. business as the defendant. An additional 29% dealt with U.S. citizens from different States, and about 3% were between U.S. businesses. A foreign citizen was the plaintiff in about 1% of diversity of citizenship cases, while a foreign nation was the plaintiff in one case during fiscal years 1996-97.

Plaintiffs won in 42% or 853 of diversity of citizenship cases. Plaintiff winners received monetary awards for damages in 726 or 85% of the cases, with a median award of $135,000. Monetary awards to plaintiffs varied, however, across the type of case. Among the 3 out of 12 plaintiff winners involved in asbestos cases, the median award was $700,000. In personal injury motor vehicle cases, the median monetary award among 226 plaintiff winners was $100,000. The median plaintiff award for medical malpractice cases was $450,000, while airplane and marine personal injury cases had median plaintiff awards of more than $1 million.

U. S. judicial districts varied in the proportion of diversity of citizenship cases terminated during fiscal years 1996-97. Among the districts with the greatest proportion of diversity of citizenship cases terminated were Arkansas-Western and Kansas (100%), Missouri-Western (96%), Tennessee-Western and Arkansas-Eastern (95%), as well as West Virginia-Northern and Louisiana-Middle (94%) (figure 3). Among those districts with the lowest proportion of diversity of citizenship cases terminated were California-Southern (7%), Alaska (14%), Washington-Western (22%) and Florida-Northern (29%).

In most States, diversity of citizenship cases accounted for between 67% and 100% of tort trials terminated within any judicial district. This was true, for example, among the judicial districts located within Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Mississippi, Georgia, and North Carolina.

In some instances, however, U.S. judicial districts within a State varied in their proportions of diversity of citizenship cases terminated. In Florida 78% of tort trial cases were terminated in the Florida-Middle District, compared to 29% in the Florida-Northern District. Similarly in Louisiana, 94% of tort trial cases terminated in the Louisiana-Middle District were diversity of citizenship cases while 48% were diversity of citizenship cases in the Louisiana-Eastern District.

Case processing time

Tort trial cases terminated in U.S. district courts during 1996-97 went from filing to termination in an average of 20.2 months C just over 1 1/2 years. All 13 asbestos cases terminated in less than 2 years, as well as a large majority of personal injury motor vehicle cases (83%) and other personal injury cases (79%). Airplane cases tended to have a longer case processing time. About 1 in 10 airplane personal injury cases took 4 or more years to terminate. More than half (58%) of airplane product liability cases terminated within 2 to 4 years.

Overall, 72% of all tort trial cases were terminated in less than 2 years, and an additional 24% within 2 to 4 years. Four percent of tort trial cases took 4 or more years to terminate.

Methodology

The primary source of data presented in this report is the Federal Judicial Center's Integrated Data Base (Civil). Data tabulations were prepared from the BJS staff analysis of source agency data sets. The Federal civil tort cate-gories used in this report are based primarily on the codes established by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts (AOUSC). Case level information is provided by individual U.S. district courts, which submit data to the AOUSC. The categories for types of cases in this report are based on those defined by the AOUSC. As a result, no detailed information is available on the number of "other personal injury" cases and "other product liability cases." For tort cases that involved more than one type of action filed, the AOUSC instructs the plaintiff's attorney if the cause fits more than one nature of suit, to select the most definitive. It is the first nature of the suit code that was used in the analysis for this report.

For tort cases where more than one basis of jurisdiction applies, the case was coded according to the highest priority jurisdiction that applies. Cases in which the U.S. Government is the plaintiff have the highest priority, followed by the U.S. Government as defendant, Federal questions, diversity of citizenship cases, then local questions. Calculations pertaining to winners and their award amounts were based on cases for which the winner was known. This differs from the 1994-95 Federal tort trial study (NCJ 165810) in which these calculations were based on the total number of tort trial cases terminated. Plaintiff and defendant winner categories do not include instances where both parties won the case.

Definitions

After court trial -- An action disposed of after the completion of a trial before a judge or magistrate judge.

After jury trial -- An action disposed of after the completion of a trial before a jury.

Procedural progress at termination -- The point to which an action progressed when it was disposed of. When used as part of these definitions, a trial is defined as a "contested proceeding where evidence is introduced." A trial is considered completed when a verdict is returned by a jury or a decision is rendered by the court.

Tort -- A civil wrong or breach of a duty to another person, as outlined by law. A very common tort is negligent operation of a motor vehicle that results in property damage and personal injury in an automobile accident.

U.S. Government defendant -- An action against agencies and officers of the United States.

U.S. Government plaintiff -- An action by agencies and officers of the United States.

Federal question cases -- Cases involving the interpretation and application of the U.S. Constitution, acts of Congress, or treaties.

Diversity of citizenship cases -- Cases involving actions in which the amount in controversy exceeds $75,000 between citizens or corporations of different States; citizens or corporations of a state and citizens or subjects or a foreign country; citizens or corporations of different states where citizens or subjects of a foreign country are additional parties; or a foreign state as defined in Title 28 U.S.C. Section 1603(a), as plaintiff, and citizens of a State or different States.

Local question -- cases involving non-Federal civil procedures based on local civil law in territorial districts.





This information came from a
US DOJ online article.

*** Any law, statute, regulation or other precedent is subject to change at any time ***

Index | Home

Contact David Matheny, Esq. for a free consultation.

(702) 388-1229










Search for more information on Vegas Law and Las Vegas Lawyers:

Google







Dempsey, Roberts
& Smith, Ltd.

Nevada Lawyer
Nevada Accident
& Injury Law
















Vegas Lawyer
Nevada Accident
& Injury Law

Index | Home

Wrongful Death | Car Accident | Slip & Fall | Malpractice | Product Defect | Other Claims






DEMPSEY, ROBERTS & SMITH, LTD.
520 South Fourth Street, Suite 360
Las Vegas, Nevada 89101

Las Vegas Lawyer - Las Vegas Attorney - Las Vegas Personal Injury Lawyer

A Lawyer In Las Vegas Can Assist You If You Need Any Of The Following:

Las Vegas Lawyers
Las Vegas Personal Injury Lawyers
Las Vegas Injury Lawyer
Las Vegas Accident Lawyer
Las Vegas Car Accident Lawyer
Las Vegas Auto Accident Lawyer
Las Vegas Wrongful Death Lawyer
Las Vegas Fatal Accident Lawyer
Las Vegas Lawyer
Las Vegas Law Firm
Attorneys
Personal Injury Attorney
Injury Attorney
Accident Attorney
Car Accident Attorney
Auto Accident Attorney
Wrongful Death Attorney
Fatal Accident Attorney
Attorney
Lawyer Help
Lawyers In Las Vegas
Personal Injury Lawyer In Las Vegas
Injury Lawyer In Las Vegas
Accident Lawyer In Las Vegas
Car Accident Lawyer In Las Vegas
Auto Accident Lawyer In Las Vegas
Wrongful Death Lawyer In Las Vegas
Fatal Accident Lawyer In Las Vegas
Lawyer In Las Vegas
Legal Help
Death Claim Lawyer
Car Wreck Lawyer
Vehicle Accident Lawyer
Dangerous Product Lawyer
Defective Product Lawyer
Product Liability Lawyer
Premises Liability Lawyer
Slip & Fall Lawyer
Medical Malpractice Lawyer
Attorney Help
Death Claim Attorney
Car Wreck Attorney
Vehicle Accident Attorney
Dangerous Product Attorney
Defective Product Attorney
Product Liability Attorney
Premises Liability Attorney
Slip & Fall Attorney
Medical Malpractice Attorney
Death Claim Attorney In Las Vegas
Car Wreck Attorney In Las Vegas
Vehicle Accident Attorney In Las Vegas
Dangerous Product Attorney In Las Vegas
Defective Product Attorney In Las Vegas
Product Liability Attorney In Las Vegas
Premises Liability Attorney In Las Vegas
Slip & Fall Attorney In Las Vegas
Medical Malpractice Attorney In Las Vegas




A Las Vegas Lawyer can help you in any area in Nevada, including:

  • Las Vegas, Nevada
  • Henderson, Nevada
  • Battle Mountain, Nevada
  • Carson City, Nevada
  • Dayton, Nevada
  • Elko, Nevada
  • Ely, Nevada
  • Eureka, Nevada
  • Fallon, Nevada
  • Fernley, Nevada
  • Goldfield, Nevada
  • Hawthorne, Nevada
  • Paradise Township, Nevada
  • Laughlin, Nevada
  • Lovelock, Nevada
  • Minden, Nevada
  • Pahrump, Nevada
  • Pioche, Nevada
  • Reno, Nevada
  • Summerlin, Nevada
  • Tonopah, Nevada
  • Virginia, Nevada
  • Wendover, Nevada
  • Winnemucca, Nevada
  • Yerington, Nevada
  • Zephyr Cove, Nevada
  • Spring Valley, Nevada
  • Mesquite, Nevada



  • Neither the State Bar of Nevada nor any agency of the State Bar has certified any lawyer identified here as a specialist or as an expert.  Anyone considering a lawyer should independently investigate the lawyer's credentials and ability. This site is intended for Nevada residents and those with legal issues arising under the jurisdiction of the State of Nevada.  This site does not give legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship.  Laws are different in other states and localities, consult a local attorney.

    The information in this web site is provided for informational purposes only. The information does not constitute legal advice. The use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship. Further communication with an attorney through the web site and e-mail may not be considered as confidential or privileged. Please contact our attorneys if you wish to discuss the contents of this web site. Any laws, rules or statutes giving any information, restrictions or deadlines, are always subject to change at any time - Contact a local attorney to obtain the current status of such information.

    In the series of Articles on this site, many government PSAs and other information are excerpted. All such materials are believed to be in the public domain. If any work is protected, contact the webmaster at any of the e-mail links and the material will be taken off the site immediately.

    If you experience unusual problems with this site or discover dead links, please email the webmaster. Thank you.

    Copyright: David Matheny, 2003-2005.